An analysis of platos argument for a just life

The Question and the Strategy 1. After Socrates asks his host what it is like being old d—e and rich d —rather rude, we might think—Cephalus says that the best thing about wealth is that it can save us from being unjust and thus smooth the way for an agreeable afterlife d—b.

An analysis of platos argument for a just life

Socrates asks Cephalus if age is as much a hardship as people say. Cephalus says old age brings peace from appetites and passions and is not much harder to bear than youth. Socrates says Cephalus may bear old age well, not because of the way he lives, but because Cephalus is wealthy.

Cephalus says that wealth lets one live a just life since a wealthy man does not need to fear owing money or not having enough to sacrifice to a god. Cephalus is using the traditional definition of a just life—paying what one owes to gods and men, and being honest. This definition is used in Greek religious works of earlier writers like Hesiod.

Active Themes Socrates asks if one can always say that doing right is just speaking truth and paying back what is owed? For instance, if a friend loans us a weapon, but then becomes insane and asks for it back—ought we to return the weapon?

Surely that is not a right action. Cephalus agrees that would not be the right action, then excuses himself because he has to attend to the sacrifice. Socrates wants to find a definition for justice or the just life, and so he tests the current definition to see if it always holds true.

Active Themes Polemarchus disagrees with Socrates and cites the poet Simonides who said that it is just to give to each what is owed to him. Simonides, says Polemarchus, meant that friends owe it to their friends to do well by them, and never harm them, and enemies are owed harm.

Socrates observes that people make mistakes, thinking an enemy a friend and vice versa, thus the just man could unintentionally help enemies and harm friends. Polemarchus redefines a friend as one who is truly useful.

An analysis of platos argument for a just life

The just man must harm those who are both bad and enemies. Polemarchus seems to think the previous version failed because it was too specific. Socrates encourages Polemarchus to make his definition more specific, and by defining "friends.

It is the function of an unjust man to cause harm. Polemarchus thinks of justice in terms of actions a person performs or does not perform.

Each time Polemarchus offers a definition Socrates tests it against specific examples, usually by analogy, as here, comparing horses and humans. Thrasymachus, unwillingly quiet, interrupts, loudly.NICHOLAS COPERNICUS. OF TORUÑ. SIX BOOKS ON. THE REVOLUTIONS OF THE HEAVENLY. SPHERES. Diligent reader, in this work, which has just been created and published, you have the motions of the fixed stars and planets, as these motions have been reconstituted on the basis of ancient as well as recent observations, and have moreover been embellished by new and marvelous .

Essay on Analysis of Plato's Apology; Essay on Analysis of Plato's Apology. Words Sep 18th, The following is an outline of the 'argument' or logos that Socrates used in his defense.

The Republic Book 1 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

A hypertext treatment of this dialogue is also available. I. Prologue (17aa) as well as why living a just life is desirable. Plato, writing through. People and ideas systems As outlined by Andrew Roberts of Middlesex University, London. Introductory sketches of the ideas of theorists, linked to Andrew Roberts' book Social Science History and the Society and Science History leslutinsduphoenix.comped from a course document "Outline of the theorists we could cover" (February ), the web page was created offline before PDF downloads of all LitCharts literature guides, Check out our revolutionary side-by-side summary and analysis.

The Republic Book 1 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes. Sign Cephalus says that wealth lets one live a just life since a wealthy man does not need to fear owing money or not having enough to.

The Allegory of the Cave, or Plato's Cave, was presented by the Greek philosopher Plato in his work Republic (a–a) to compare "the effect of education (παιδεία) and the lack of it on our nature".It is written as a dialogue between Plato's brother Glaucon and his mentor Socrates, narrated by the leslutinsduphoenix.com allegory is presented after the analogy of the sun (b–c) and the.

Christianity and the Birth of Science by Michael Bumbulis, Ph.D The author holds an M.S. degree in Zoology from Ohio State University and a Ph.D in Genetics from Case Western Reserve University.

Plato | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy